Collusions Between Patients and Clinicians in End-of-Life Care: Why Clarity Matters.

Details

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State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Serval ID
serval:BIB_8A5FBF6C1224
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Collusions Between Patients and Clinicians in End-of-Life Care: Why Clarity Matters.
Journal
Journal of pain and symptom management
Author(s)
Stiefel F., Nakamura K., Terui T., Ishitani K.
ISSN
1873-6513 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0885-3924
Publication state
Published
Issued date
04/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
53
Number
4
Pages
776-782
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Case Reports ; Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Collusion, an unconscious dynamic between patients and clinicians, may provoke strong emotions, unreflected behaviors, and a negative impact on care. Collusions, prevalent in the health care setting, are triggered by situations which signify an unresolved psychological issue relevant for both, patient and clinician. After an introductory definition of collusion, two archetypal situations of collusion-based on material from a regular supervision of a palliative care specialist by a liaison psychiatrist-and means of working through collusion are presented. The theoretical framework of collusion is then described and the conceptual shortcomings of the palliative care literature in this respect discussed, justifying the call for more clarity. Finally, cultural aspects and societal injunctions on the dying, contributing to the development of collusion in end-of-life care, are discussed.

Keywords
Aged, Attitude to Death, Communication, Culture, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Physician-Patient Relations, Specialization, Terminal Care, Transference (Psychology), Unconscious (Psychology), Collusion, communication, counter transference, palliative care, transference
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
17/01/2017 20:03
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:49
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