Migrants from sub-Saharan Africa in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study: a single center study of epidemiologic migration-specific and clinical features

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_86041C0CBBC9
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Migrants from sub-Saharan Africa in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study: a single center study of epidemiologic migration-specific and clinical features
Journal
AIDS Patient Care and STDs
Author(s)
Staehelin  C., Egloff  N., Rickenbach  M., Kopp  C., Furrer  H.
ISSN
1087-2914 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
11/2004
Volume
18
Number
11
Pages
665-75
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Nov
Abstract
According to official Swiss data an increasing number of HIV-positive migrants reside in Switzerland. The present study examined epidemiologic, clinical, and migration-specific characteristics of HIV-infected migrants at the HIV clinic of the University Hospital of Berne, which is one of the centers of the national, prospective Swiss HIV cohort study. Data were collected by chart review. Among the 1331 patients the proportion of northwestern European patients decreased from 88% before 1989 to 67% in the late 1990s while the number of patients from sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia increased from 3 (1.6%) to 47 (14%) and from 2 (1%) to 17 (5%), respectively. Sub-Saharan Africans and Southeast Asians were more likely to be younger, female, and infected heterosexually. At first clinical visit the various patient groups did not differ in CD4 counts or HIV RNA levels. Sub-Saharan African patients were more likely to be anemic. A majority of HIV-positive migrants were most likely infected prior to arrival in Switzerland. Sub-Saharan Africans and Southeast Asians were often diagnosed to be HIV-positive after showing suggestive symptoms of infection, while European patients were more often diagnosed in a screening setting. Thirteen patients with indication for antiretroviral therapy were forced to leave Switzerland because they were denied asylum. In response to the increasing migrant population attending the HIV clinic, further qualitative and quantitative research is required to improve understanding of this vulnerable population group and to promote their knowledge of the disease and its prevention.
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/drug therapy/*ethnology Adult Africa South of the Sahara/ethnology Ambulatory Care Facilities/*statistics & numerical data Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use Cohort Studies Emigration and Immigration/*statistics & numerical data/trends Female Humans Male Referral and Consultation Switzerland/epidemiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
29/01/2008 8:52
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:45
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