Intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in Papua New Guinean infants exposed to Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax: a randomized controlled trial.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_85F9D221165C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in Papua New Guinean infants exposed to Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax: a randomized controlled trial.
Journal
Plos Medicine
Author(s)
Senn N., Rarau P., Stanisic D.I., Robinson L., Barnadas C., Manong D., Salib M., Iga J., Tarongka N., Ley S., Rosanas-Urgell A., Aponte J.J., Zimmerman P.A., Beeson J.G., Schofield L., Siba P., Rogerson S.J., Reeder J.C., Mueller I.
ISSN
1549-1676 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1549-1277
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Number
e1001195
Pages
1-14
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi) has been shown in randomized trials to reduce malaria-related morbidity in African infants living in areas of high Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) transmission. It remains unclear whether IPTi is an appropriate prevention strategy in non-African settings or those co-endemic for P. vivax (Pv).
METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study, 1,121 Papua New Guinean infants were enrolled into a three-arm placebo-controlled randomized trial and assigned to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) (25 mg/kg and 1.25 mg/kg) plus amodiaquine (AQ) (10 mg/kg, 3 d, n = 374), SP plus artesunate (AS) (4 mg/kg, 3 d, n = 374), or placebo (n = 373), given at 3, 6, 9 and 12 mo. Both participants and study teams were blinded to treatment allocation. The primary end point was protective efficacy (PE) against all episodes of clinical malaria from 3 to 15 mo of age. Analysis was by modified intention to treat. The PE (compared to placebo) against clinical malaria episodes (caused by all species) was 29% (95% CI, 10-43, p ≤ 0.001) in children receiving SP-AQ and 12% (95% CI, -11 to 30, p = 0.12) in those receiving SP-AS. Efficacy was higher against Pf than Pv. In the SP-AQ group, Pf incidence was 35% (95% CI, 9-54, p = 0.012) and Pv incidence was 23% (95% CI, 0-41, p = 0.048) lower than in the placebo group. IPTi with SP-AS protected only against Pf episodes (PE = 31%, 95% CI, 4-51, p = 0.027), not against Pv episodes (PE = 6%, 95% CI, -24 to 26, p = 0.759). Number of observed adverse events/serious adverse events did not differ between treatment arms (p > 0.55). None of the serious adverse events were thought to be treatment-related, and the vomiting rate was low in both treatment groups (1.4%-2.0%). No rebound in malaria morbidity was observed for 6 mo following the intervention.
CONCLUSIONS: IPTi using a long half-life drug combination is efficacious for the prevention of malaria and anemia in infants living in a region highly endemic for both Pf and Pv.
Keywords
Amodiaquine/therapeutic use, Antimalarials/therapeutic use, Drug Combinations, Female, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Malaria/parasitology, Malaria/prevention & control, Male, Plasmodium falciparum/drug effects, Plasmodium falciparum/pathogenicity, Plasmodium vivax/drug effects, Plasmodium vivax/pathogenicity, Pyrimethamine/therapeutic use, Sulfadoxine/therapeutic use
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
11/02/2013 16:39
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:45
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