Atrioventricular septal defects among infants in Europe: a population-based study of prevalence, associated anomalies, and survival.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_85F3D69E0E97
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Atrioventricular septal defects among infants in Europe: a population-based study of prevalence, associated anomalies, and survival.
Journal
Cardiology in the Young
Author(s)
Christensen N., Andersen H., Garne E., Wellesley D., Addor M.C., Haeusler M., Khoshnood B., Mullaney C., Rankin J., Tucker D.
ISSN
1467-1107 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1047-9511
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
23
Number
4
Pages
560-567
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: JOURNAL ARTICLE . PDF type: Original article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of chromosomal and non-chromosomal cases of atrioventricular septal defects in Europe. METHODS: Data were obtained from EUROCAT, a European network of population-based registries collecting data on congenital anomalies. Data from 13 registries for the period 2000-2008 were included. RESULTS: There was a total of 993 cases of atrioventricular septal defects, with a total prevalence of 5.3 per 10,000 births (95% confidence interval 4.1 to 6.5). Of the total cases, 250 were isolated cardiac lesions, 583 were chromosomal cases, 79 had multiple anomalies, 58 had heterotaxia sequence, and 23 had a monogenic syndrome. The total prevalence of chromosomal cases was 3.1 per 10,000 (95% confidence interval 1.9 to 4.3), with a large variation between registers. Of the 993 cases, 639 cases were live births, 45 were stillbirths, and 309 were terminations of pregnancy owing to foetal anomaly. Among the groups, additional associated cardiac anomalies were most frequent in heterotaxia cases (38%) and least frequent in chromosomal cases (8%). Coarctation of the aorta was the most common associated cardiac defect. The 1-week survival rate for live births was 94%. CONCLUSION: Of all cases, three-quarters were associated with other anomalies, both chromosomal and non-chromosomal. For infants with atrioventricular septal defects and no chromosomal anomalies, cardiac defects were often more complex compared with infants with atrioventricular septal defects and a chromosomal anomaly. Clinical outcomes for atrioventricular septal defects varied between regions. The proportion of termination of pregnancy for foetal anomaly was higher for cases with multiple anomalies, chromosomal anomalies, and heterotaxia sequence.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
21/01/2013 10:01
Last modification date
01/10/2019 7:18
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