Difference in distribution of microtubule-associated proteins 5a and 5b during the development of cerebral cortex and corpus callosum in cats: dependence on phosphorylation.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_85EF0478D93A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Difference in distribution of microtubule-associated proteins 5a and 5b during the development of cerebral cortex and corpus callosum in cats: dependence on phosphorylation.
Journal
Brain Research. Developmental Brain Research
Author(s)
Riederer B.M., Guadano-Ferraz A., Innocenti G.M.
ISSN
0165-3806 (Print)
ISSN-L
0165-3806
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1990
Volume
56
Number
2
Pages
235-243
Language
english
Abstract
MAP5, a microtubule-associated protein characteristic of differentiating neurons, was studied in the developing visual cortex and corpus callosum of the cat. In juvenile cortical tissue, during the first month after birth, MAP5 is present as a protein doublet of molecular weights of 320 and 300 kDa, defined as MAP5a and MAP5b, respectively. MAP5a is the phosphorylated form. MAP5a decreases two weeks after birth and is no longer detectable at the beginning of the second postnatal month; MAP5b also decreases after the second postnatal week but more slowly and it is still present in the adult. In the corpus callosum only MAP5a is present between birth and the end of the first postnatal month. Afterwards only MAP5b is present but decreases in concentration more than 3-fold towards adulthood. Our immunocytochemical studies show MAP5 in somata, dendrites and axonal processes of cortical neurons. In adult tissue it is very prominent in pyramidal cells of layer V. In the corpus callosum MAP5 is present in axons at all ages. There is strong evidence that MAP5a is located in axons while MAP5b seems restricted to somata and dendrites until P28, but is found in callosal axons from P39 onwards. Biochemical experiments indicate that the state of phosphorylation of MAP5 influences its association with structural components. After high speed centrifugation of early postnatal brain tissue, MAP5a remains with pellet fractions while most MAP5b is soluble. In conclusion, phosphorylation of MAP5 may regulate (1) its intracellular distribution within axons and dendrites, and (2) its ability to interact with other subcellular components.
Keywords
Aging, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Cats, Cerebral Cortex/chemistry, Cerebral Cortex/cytology, Corpus Callosum/chemistry, Corpus Callosum/cytology, Immunohistochemistry, Microtubule-Associated Proteins/analysis, Molecular Weight, Organ Specificity, Phosphorylation, Subcellular Fractions/chemistry
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/01/2008 14:34
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:45
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