Metacognitive training for schizophrenia: a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

Details

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_85D8546830C8
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Metacognitive training for schizophrenia: a multicentre randomised controlled trial.
Journal
Schizophrenia Research
Author(s)
Briki M., Monnin J., Haffen E., Sechter D., Favrod J., Netillard C., Cheraitia E., Marin K., Govyadovskaya S., Tio G., Bonin B., Chauvet-Gelinier J.C., Leclerc S., Hodé Y., Vidailhet P., Berna F., Bertschy A.Z., Vandel P.
ISSN
1573-2509 (Electronic)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
157
Number
1-3
Pages
99-106
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
A psychotherapeutic approach for schizophrenia is now recommended as an adjuvant for psychopharmacology, since antipsychotic medications only have a partial impact especially as regards positive symptoms and insight. In addition, cognitive distortions and the lack of metacognitive skills might increase positive symptoms leading to poor social functioning. This underlines the need for specific approaches which target cognitive processes relevant for insight, and abilities in metacognition. Metacognitive training (MCT) is a structured group intervention, which enhances a patient's reflection on cognitive biases and improves problem-solving. The aim of our study was to assess MCTs' short term impact on insight, symptoms and quality of life. Fifty patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders and persistent positive symptoms (delusions or hallucinations) were enrolled in the study. After baseline assessment participants were randomised either to supportive therapy or MCT. Both groups used the same design (1h-session twice a week during 8weeks) although the basic knowledge given to participants was different between interventions. Participants were assessed at eight weeks based on the Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Psychotic Symptom Rating Scales, the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia and the Quality of Life Scale. Between-group differences were significant in favour of MCT on the PANSS positive scale. Between-group differences in post- and pre-test values showed a trend in favour of MCT for insight on hallucinations. Results of our study indicate that the MCT has an effect on reducing positive symptomatology, and a trend impact on insight and social functioning.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
02/10/2014 17:33
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:45
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