Greater topoclimatic control of above- versus below-ground communities.

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_858D58CF6336
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Greater topoclimatic control of above- versus below-ground communities.
Journal
Global Change Biology
Author(s)
Mod H.K., Scherrer D., Di Cola V., Broennimann O., Blandenier Q., Breiner F.T., Buri A., Goudet J., Guex N., Lara E., Mitchell EAD, Niculita-Hirzel H., Pagni M., Pellissier L., Pinto-Figueroa E., Sanders I.R., Schmidt B.R., Seppey CVW, Singer D., Ursenbacher S., Yashiro E., van der Meer J.R., Guisan A.
ISSN
1365-2486 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1354-1013
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
26
Pages
6715–6728
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Assessing the degree to which climate explains the spatial distributions of different taxonomic and functional groups is essential for anticipating the effects of climate change on ecosystems. Most effort so far has focused on above-ground organisms, which offer only a partial view on the response of biodiversity to environmental gradients. Here including both above- and below-ground organisms, we quantified the degree of topoclimatic control on the occurrence patterns of >1,500 taxa and phylotypes along a c. 3,000 m elevation gradient, by fitting species distribution models. Higher model performances for animals and plants than for soil microbes (fungi, bacteria and protists) suggest that the direct influence of topoclimate is stronger on above-ground species than on below-ground microorganisms. Accordingly, direct climate change effects are predicted to be stronger for above-ground than for below-ground taxa, whereas factors expressing local soil microclimate and geochemistry are likely more important to explain and forecast the occurrence patterns of soil microbiota. Detailed mapping and future scenarios of soil microclimate and microhabitats, together with comparative studies of interacting and ecologically dependent above- and below-ground biota, are thus needed to understand and realistically forecast the future distribution of ecosystems.
Keywords
animals, climate change, ecosystems, microorganisms, niche model, plants, species distributions, taxonomic group
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
07/09/2020 14:15
Last modification date
30/04/2021 7:12
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