Role of substrate utilization and thermogenesis on body-weight control with particular reference to alcohol.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_84E43B55C1C0
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Role of substrate utilization and thermogenesis on body-weight control with particular reference to alcohol.
Journal
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
Author(s)
Schutz Y.
ISSN
0029-6651 (Print)
ISSN-L
0029-6651
Publication state
Published
Issued date
11/2000
Volume
59
Number
4
Pages
511-517
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Alcohol (ethanol; EtOH) provides fuel energy to the body (29.7 kJ (7. 1 kcal)/g, 23.4 kJ (5.6 kcal)/ml), as do other macronutrients, but no associated essential nutrients. The thermogenic effect of EtOH (on average 15 % of its metabolizable value) is much greater than that of the main substrates utilized by the body, i.e. fat and carbohydrates (CHO), suggesting a lower net efficiency of energy utilization for EtOH than for fat and CHO. EtOH cannot be stored in the body and is toxic, so that there is an obligatory continuous oxidation of EtOH and it becomes the priority fuel to be metabolized. In contrast to CHO, its rate of oxidation does not depend on the dose ingested. As with CHO intake, it engenders a shift in postprandial substrate utilization (decrease in fat oxidation), but by a non-insulin-mediated mechanism. A limited amount of EtOH can be converted to fatty acids by hepatic de novo lipogenesis (as occurs with high levels of CHO feeding) from acetate production, which inhibits lipolysis in peripheral tissues. There is no evidence that EtOH consumed under normoenergetic conditions (i.e. isoenergetically replacing CHO or fat) leads to greater body fat storage than fat or CHO. However, there is still a lack of experimental studies on the influence of EtOH on the level of spontaneous physical activity in man. This effect may well depend on the dose of EtOH consumed as well as other intrinsic factors.
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking/metabolism, Body Weight, Dietary Carbohydrates/metabolism, Dietary Fats/metabolism, Energy Intake, Energy Metabolism, Ethanol/metabolism, Humans, Lipid Metabolism, Lipids/biosynthesis, Liver/metabolism, Oxidation-Reduction, Thermogenesis/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
21/01/2008 13:09
Last modification date
25/09/2019 6:09
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