Brain pathology in focal status epilepticus: evidence from experimental models.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_848D0A1620FE
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Brain pathology in focal status epilepticus: evidence from experimental models.
Journal
Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews
Author(s)
de Curtis M., Rossetti A.O., Verde D.V., van Vliet E.A., Ekdahl C.T.
ISSN
1873-7528 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0149-7634
Publication state
Published
Issued date
10/09/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
131
Pages
834-846
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Status Epilepticus (SE) is often a neurological emergency characterized by abnormally sustained, longer than habitual seizures. The new ILAE classification reports that SE "…can have long-term consequences including neuronal death, neuronal injury…depending on the type and duration of seizures". While it is accepted that generalized convulsive SE exerts detrimental effects on the brain, it is not clear if other forms of SE, such as focal non-convulsive SE, leads to brain pathology and contributes to long-term deficits in patients. With the available clinical and experimental data, it is hard to discriminate the specific action of the underlying SE etiologies from that exerted by epileptiform activity. This information is highly relevant in the clinic for better treatment stratification, which may include both medical and surgical intervention for seizure control. Here we review experimental studies of focal SE, with an emphasis on focal non-convulsive SE. We present a repertoire of brain pathologies observed in the most commonly used animal models and attempt to establish a link between experimental findings and human condition(s). The extensive literature on focal SE animal models suggest that the current approaches have significant limitations in terms of translatability of the findings to the clinic. We highlight the need for a more stringent description of SE features and brain pathology in experimental studies in animal models, to improve the accuracy in predicting clinical translation.
Keywords
Epilepsy, animal models, brain damage, gliosis, status epilepticus, Animal models, Brain damage, Gliosis, Status epilepticus
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
21/09/2021 10:40
Last modification date
05/11/2021 6:39
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