Effect of acute physical exercise on motor sequence memory.

Details

Ressource 1Download: 32948800.pdf (1919.38 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_83F91943D332
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Effect of acute physical exercise on motor sequence memory.
Journal
Scientific reports
Author(s)
Marin Bosch B., Bringard A., Logrieco MG, Lauer E., Imobersteg N., Thomas A., Ferretti G., Schwartz S., Igloi K.
ISSN
2045-2322 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2045-2322
Publication state
Published
Issued date
18/09/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
10
Number
1
Pages
15322
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Acute physical exercise improves memory functions by increasing neural plasticity in the hippocampus. In animals, a single session of physical exercise has been shown to boost anandamide (AEA), an endocannabinoid known to promote hippocampal plasticity. Hippocampal neuronal networks encode episodic memory representations, including the temporal organization of elements, and can thus benefit motor sequence learning. While previous work established that acute physical exercise has positive effects on declarative memory linked to hippocampal plasticity mechanisms, its influence on memory for motor sequences, and especially on neural mechanisms underlying possible effects, has been less investigated. Here we studied the impact of acute physical exercise on motor sequence learning, and its underlying neurophysiological mechanisms in humans, using a cross-over randomized within-subjects design. We measured behavior, fMRI activity, and circulating AEA levels in fifteen healthy participants while they performed a serial reaction time task before and after a short period of exercise (moderate or high intensity) or rest. We show that exercise enhanced motor sequence memory, significantly for high intensity exercise and tending towards significance for moderate intensity exercise. This enhancement correlated with AEA increase, and dovetailed with local increases in caudate nucleus and hippocampus activity. These findings demonstrate that acute physical exercise promotes sequence learning, thus attesting the overarching benefit of exercise to hippocampus-related memory functions.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Arachidonic Acids/blood, Brain/diagnostic imaging, Brain/physiology, Endocannabinoids/blood, Exercise/physiology, Exercise/psychology, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Memory/physiology, Nontherapeutic Human Experimentation, Polyunsaturated Alkamides/blood, Random Allocation, Reaction Time, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
21/09/2020 21:10
Last modification date
04/02/2021 7:25
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