Fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography in ocular syphilis: an exploratory study.

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Ressource 1Download: serval:BIB_83B496C1F30D.P001 (275.17 [Ko])
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_83B496C1F30D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography in ocular syphilis: an exploratory study.
Journal
Graefe's Archive For Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology = Albrecht Von Graefes Archiv Für Klinische Und Experimentelle Ophthalmologie
Author(s)
Balaskas K., Sergentanis T.N., Giulieri S., Guex-Crosier Y.
ISSN
1435-702X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0721-832X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
250
Number
5
Pages
721-730
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Fluorescein (FA) and indocyanine-green angiography (ICGA) may offer valuable information concerning disease severity and prognosis in ocular syphilis. The aim of the present study is to describe angiographic patterns encountered in the context of ocular syphilis, and to explore the associations between specific angiographic manifestations and severity of disease presentation, as well as disease evolution after treatment.
METHODS: We performed a retrospective institutional study with the inclusion of 23 patients with ocular syphilis presenting to the uveitis clinic of the Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital in a 10-year period. FA and ICGA were performed following a standard protocol for posterior uveitis. Patterns of fluorescence were noted, and statistical associations between each angiographic pattern and any demographic, clinical, or laboratory parameter at baseline and after treatment were sought.
RESULTS: The presence of any dark dots in ICGA was significantly associated with anterior uveitis (p = 0.031). The presence of hot spots in ICGA was significantly associated with longer duration of symptoms prior to initial visit (p = 0.032) and with male gender (p = 0.012). Weak non-significant trends were found associating vascular staining in FA with anterior uveitis (p = 0.066), vitritis (p = 0.069), and younger age (p = 0.061), as well as disc hyperfluorescence in FA with seropositivity for HIV (p = 0.089) and macular edema in FA with longer disease duration (p = 0.061). The presence of any dark dots in ICGA exhibited a weak trend of association with anterior uveitis and/or vitritis (p = 0.079).
CONCLUSIONS: Out of the several associations identified implicating specific angiographic features, we underline the possible role of the presence of dark dots in ICGA for identifying active inflammation, and the role of hot spots in ICGA as markers of long-standing disease. Vascular staining in FA appears to be more common in patients with severe ocular inflammation with presence of anterior uveitis and/or vitritis.
Keywords
Adult, Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use, Coloring Agents/diagnostic use, Eye Infections, Bacterial/diagnosis, Eye Infections, Bacterial/drug therapy, Female, Fluorescein Angiography, Humans, Indocyanine Green/diagnostic use, Injections, Intravenous, Male, Middle Aged, Penicillins/therapeutic use, Retrospective Studies, Syphilis/diagnosis, Syphilis/drug therapy, Syphilis Serodiagnosis, Uveitis/diagnosis, Uveitis/drug therapy
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
28/05/2012 18:02
Last modification date
01/10/2019 7:18
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