Major Differences in the Diversity of Mycobiomes Associated with Wheat Processing and Domestic Environments: Significant Findings from High-Throughput Sequencing of Fungal Barcode ITS1.

Details

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_8320E278D9DA
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Major Differences in the Diversity of Mycobiomes Associated with Wheat Processing and Domestic Environments: Significant Findings from High-Throughput Sequencing of Fungal Barcode ITS1.
Journal
International journal of environmental research and public health
Author(s)
Yashiro E., Savova-Bianchi D., Niculita-Hirzel H.
ISSN
1660-4601 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1660-4601
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/07/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
16
Number
13
Pages
2335
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Occupational exposure to grain dust is associated with both acute and chronic effects on the airways. However, the aetiology of these effects is not completely understood, mainly due to the complexity and variety of potentially causative agents to which workers are exposed during cereals process. In this study, we characterized the mycobiome during different steps of wheat processing-harvesting, grain unloading and straw handling-and compared it to mycobiomes of domestic environments-rural and urban. To do so, settled dust was collected at a six month interval for six weeks in the close proximity of 142 participants, 74 occupationally exposed to wheat dust-freshly harvested or stored-and 68 not occupationally exposed to it. Fungal community composition was determined in those samples by high-throughput sequencing of the primary fungal barcode marker internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1). The comparison of different mycobiomes revealed that fungal richness, as well as their composition, was much higher in the domestic environment than at the workplace. Furthermore, we found that the fungal community composition strongly differed between workplaces where workers handled freshly harvested wheat and those where they handled stored wheat. Indicator species for each exposed population were identified. Our results emphasize the complexity of exposure of grain workers and farmers and open new perspectives in the identification of the etiological factors responsible for the respiratory pathologies induced by wheat dust exposure.
Keywords
bioaerosols, farmers, grain dust, harvesters, indoor, mycobiome, rural, terminal elevator operators, urban, wheat
Pubmed
Publisher's website
Open Access
Yes
APC
1800 CHF
Create date
03/07/2019 9:58
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:43
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