Impact of anti-insulin antibodies on islet transplantation outcome: data from the GRAGIL Network

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_80E324A62CB0
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Impact of anti-insulin antibodies on islet transplantation outcome: data from the GRAGIL Network
Journal
Transplantation
Author(s)
Lablanche S., Borot S., Thaunat O., Bayle F., Badet L., Morelon E., Thivolet C., Wojtusciszyn A., Frimat L., Kessler L., Penfornis A., Brault C., Colin C., Bosco D., Berney T., Benhamou P. Y., Gragil Network
ISSN
1534-6080 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0041-1337
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2014
Volume
98
Number
4
Pages
475-82
Language
english
Notes
Lablanche, Sandrine
Borot, Sophie
Thaunat, Olivier
Bayle, Francois
Badet, Lionel
Morelon, Emmanuel
Thivolet, Charles
Wojtusciszyn, Anne
Frimat, Luc
Kessler, Laurence
Penfornis, Alfred
Brault, Coralie
Colin, Cyrille
Bosco, Domenico
Berney, Thierry
Benhamou, Pierre Y
eng
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Transplantation. 2014 Aug 27;98(4):475-82. doi: 10.1097/TP.0000000000000081.
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin antibodies (IA), altering the pharmacokinetics of circulating insulin, might be associated with high glucose concentration, prolonged hypoglycemia, and higher insulin requirement. The impact of IA on islet transplantation has never been explored. Our aim was to evaluate islet transplantation results at 1 year according to the presence of IA. METHODS: Our work is a retrospective, case-control study, comparing IA-negative and IA-positive patients among the cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes transplanted within the Swiss-French GRAGIL network between 2003 and 2010. RESULTS: Data about IA were available for 17 patients. Before islet transplantation, 10 patients (59%) were screened positive for IA. At 12 months after transplantation, IA-positive patients reached insulin independence less frequently than IA-negative patients (cumulative incidence of insulin independence, 22.2% vs. 71.4%; P=0.02); beta score was >/=7 in 43% of IA-negative patients versus 0% in IA-positive patients (P=0.022). When comparing IA-positive patients with IA-negative patients, insulin dose was 0.15 U/kg (0.10-0.18 U/kg) versus 0.01 U/kg (0-0.09 U/kg) (P=0.2); HbA1c was 6.1% (5.8%-6.3%) versus 6.1% (5.9%-6.8%) (P=0.16); basal C-peptide level was 460 rhomol/L (350-510 rhomol/L) versus 265 rhomol/L (177-405 rhomol/L) (P=0.28); occurrence of hypoglycemia was 12.5% versus 16.5% (P=0.9); and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance was 1.25 (1-2.4) versus 0.7 (0.52-0.92) (P=0.01). CONCLUSION: After islet transplantation, IA-positive patients achieved insulin independence less frequently, exhibiting lower beta score and higher homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance compared with IA-negative patients. However, in both groups, islet transplantation restored good glycemic control and drastically reduced hypoglycemia and insulin requirements.
Keywords
Adult, Blood Glucose/analysis, Case-Control Studies, Female, Humans, Insulin Antibodies/analysis/*physiology, Insulin Resistance, *Islets of Langerhans Transplantation, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome
Pubmed
Create date
14/06/2021 8:58
Last modification date
18/09/2021 5:38
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