Effects of social organization and elevation on spatial genetic structure in a montane ant

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_7F221348594D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Effects of social organization and elevation on spatial genetic structure in a montane ant
Journal
Ecology and Evolution
Author(s)
Fontcuberta Amaranta, Kapun Martin, Tran Van Patrick, Purcell Jessica, Chapuisat Michel
ISSN
2045-7758
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Number
5
Pages
e8813
Language
english
Notes
https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.8813
Abstract
Abstract Studying patterns of population structure across the landscape sheds light on dispersal and demographic processes, which helps to inform conservation decisions. Here, we study how social organization and landscape factors affect spatial patterns of genetic differentiation in an ant species living in mountainous regions. Using genome-wide SNP markers, we assess population structure in the Alpine silver ant, Formica selysi. This species has two social forms controlled by a supergene. The monogyne form has one queen per colony, while the polygyne form has multiple queens per colony. The two social forms co-occur in the same populations. For both social forms, we found a strong pattern of isolation-by-distance across the Alps. Within regions, genetic differentiation between populations was weaker for the monogyne form than for the polygyne form. We suggest that this pattern is due to higher dispersal and effective population sizes in the monogyne form. In addition, we found stronger isolation-by-distance and lower genetic diversity in high elevation populations, compared to lowland populations, suggesting that gene flow between F. selysi populations in the Alps occurs mostly through riparian corridors along lowland valleys. Overall, this survey highlights the need to consider intraspecific polymorphisms when assessing population connectivity and calls for special attention to the conservation of lowland habitats in mountain regions.
Keywords
dispersal, landscape genetics, mountain–valley model, population genetics, social polymorphism
Create date
18/05/2022 15:23
Last modification date
15/06/2022 6:36
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