Why disease ecology needs life-history theory: a host perspective.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_7AD71B5DA7E3
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Why disease ecology needs life-history theory: a host perspective.
Journal
Ecology letters
Author(s)
Valenzuela-Sánchez A., Wilber M.Q., Canessa S., Bacigalupe L.D., Muths E., Schmidt B.R., Cunningham A.A., Ozgul A., Johnson PTJ, Cayuela H.
ISSN
1461-0248 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1461-023X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
04/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Editor
Hodgson Dave
Volume
24
Number
4
Pages
876-890
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
When facing an emerging infectious disease of conservation concern, we often have little information on the nature of the host-parasite interaction to inform management decisions. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the life-history strategies of host species can be predictive of individual- and population-level responses to infectious disease, even without detailed knowledge on the specifics of the host-parasite interaction. Here, we argue that a deeper integration of life-history theory into disease ecology is timely and necessary to improve our capacity to understand, predict and mitigate the impact of endemic and emerging infectious diseases in wild populations. Using wild vertebrates as an example, we show that host life-history characteristics influence host responses to parasitism at different levels of organisation, from individuals to communities. We also highlight knowledge gaps and future directions for the study of life-history and host responses to parasitism. We conclude by illustrating how this theoretical insight can inform the monitoring and control of infectious diseases in wildlife.
Keywords
Animals, Animals, Wild, Ecology, Host-Parasite Interactions, Humans, Life History Traits, Vertebrates, Demographic compensation, demography, outbreak, pace of life, pathogen, slow-fast continuum, vertebrates
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
26/01/2021 9:36
Last modification date
31/03/2021 6:35
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