Guanylate-Binding Protein-Dependent Noncanonical Inflammasome Activation Prevents Burkholderia thailandensis-Induced Multinucleated Giant Cell Formation.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_78967419823A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Guanylate-Binding Protein-Dependent Noncanonical Inflammasome Activation Prevents Burkholderia thailandensis-Induced Multinucleated Giant Cell Formation.
Journal
mBio
Author(s)
Dilucca M., Ramos S., Shkarina K., Santos J.C., Broz P.
ISSN
2150-7511 (Electronic)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
31/08/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Number
4
Pages
e0205421
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Inflammasomes are cytosolic multiprotein signaling complexes that are activated upon pattern recognition receptor-mediated recognition of pathogen-derived ligands or endogenous danger signals. Their assembly activates the downstream inflammatory caspase-1 and caspase-4/5 (human) or caspase-11 (mouse), which induces cytokine release and pyroptotic cell death through the cleavage of the pore-forming effector gasdermin D. Pathogen detection by host cells also results in the production and release of interferons (IFNs), which fine-tune inflammasome-mediated responses. IFN-induced guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) have been shown to control the activation of the noncanonical inflammasome by recruiting caspase-4 on the surface of cytosolic Gram-negative bacteria and promoting its interaction with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Burkholderia thailandensis infects epithelial cells and macrophages and hijacks the host actin polymerization machinery to spread into neighboring cells. This process causes host cell fusion and the formation of so-called multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs). Caspase-1- and IFN-regulated caspase-11-mediated inflammasome pathways play an important protective role against B. thailandensis in mice, but little is known about the role of IFNs and inflammasomes during B. thailandensis infection of human cells, particularly epithelial cells. Here, we report that IFN-γ priming of human epithelial cells restricts B. thailandensis-induced MNGC formation in a GBP1-dependent manner. Mechanistically, GBP1 does not promote bacteriolysis or impair actin-based bacterial motility but acts by inducing caspase-4-dependent pyroptosis of the infected cell. In addition, we show that IFN-γ priming of human primary macrophages confers a more efficient antimicrobial effect through inflammasome activation, further confirming the important role that interferon signaling plays in restricting Burkholderia replication and spread. IMPORTANCE The Gram-negative bacteria of the Burkholderia species are associated with human diseases ranging from pneumonia to life-threatening melioidosis. Upon infection through inhalation, ingestion, or the percutaneous route, these bacteria can spread and establish granuloma-like lesions resulting from the fusion of host cells to form multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs). Burkholderia resistance to several antibiotics highlights the importance to better understand how the innate immune system controls infections. Here, we report that interferons protect human epithelial cells against Burkholderia-induced MNGC formation, specifically through the action of the interferon-induced GBP1 protein. Mechanistically, GBP1 acts by inducing caspase-4-dependent cell death through pyroptosis, allowing the infected cells to be quickly eliminated before bacterial spread and the formation of MNGCs. This study provides evidence that interferon-induced innate immune activation, through GBP1 and caspase-4, confers protection against Burkholderia infection, potentially opening new perspectives for therapeutic approaches.
Keywords
antimicrobial mechanisms, guanylate-binding proteins, host-pathogen interactions, inflammasomes, innate immunity
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
17/09/2021 17:56
Last modification date
25/09/2021 5:37
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