Convergent evolution of a labile nutritional symbiosis in ants

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_77C316F8F2D8
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Convergent evolution of a labile nutritional symbiosis in ants
Journal
The ISME journal
Author(s)
Jackson R., Monnin D., Patapiou P.A., Golding G., Helanterä H., Oettler J., Heinze J., Wurm Y., Economou C.K., Chapuisat M., Henry L.M.
ISSN
1751-7370 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1751-7362
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
16
Number
9
Pages
2114-2122
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Ants are among the most successful organisms on Earth. It has been suggested that forming symbioses with nutrient-supplementing microbes may have contributed to their success, by allowing ants to invade otherwise inaccessible niches. However, it is unclear whether ants have evolved symbioses repeatedly to overcome the same nutrient limitations. Here, we address this question by comparing the independently evolved symbioses in Camponotus, Plagiolepis, Formica and Cardiocondyla ants. Our analysis reveals the only metabolic function consistently retained in all of the symbiont genomes is the capacity to synthesise tyrosine. We also show that in certain multi-queen lineages that have co-diversified with their symbiont for millions of years, only a fraction of queens carry the symbiont, suggesting ants differ in their colony-level reliance on symbiont-derived resources. Our results imply that symbioses can arise to solve common problems, but hosts may differ in their dependence on symbionts, highlighting the evolutionary forces influencing the persistence of long-term endosymbiotic mutualisms.
Keywords
Animals, Ants, Phylogeny, Symbiosis
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
21/06/2022 9:27
Last modification date
21/11/2022 8:31
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