Preparedness for Life-Threatening Situations in a Pediatric Tertiary-Care University Children's Hospital: A Survey.

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_73A6C2B3E082
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Preparedness for Life-Threatening Situations in a Pediatric Tertiary-Care University Children's Hospital: A Survey.
Journal
Children
Author(s)
Ulmer F., Pallivathukal S., Bartenstein A., Bieri R., Studer D., Lava SAG
ISSN
2227-9067 (Print)
ISSN-L
2227-9067
Publication state
Published
Issued date
16/02/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Number
2
Pages
271
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Pediatric nurses and physicians are rarely exposed to life-threatening events. Understanding the needs of clinicians is key for designing continuing training programs. A survey exploring preparedness to manage life-threatening events as well as training needs was mailed to all clinically active nurses and physicians at a tertiary-level referral children's hospital. Overall, 469 participants out of 871 answered the questionnaire (54% response rate). Respondents felt well or very well (nurses 93%, physicians 74%) prepared to recognize a deteriorating child and rated their theoretical understanding (70% well or very well prepared) of how to manage life-threatening situations significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than their cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) preparedness (52% well or very well prepared). Both perceived theoretical understanding (p < 0.0001) and CPR preparedness (p < 0.002) were rated higher among nurses than physicians. Arrhythmias, shock, cardiac arrest and airway management constitute main areas of perceived training need. In conclusion, although a majority of pediatric nurses and physicians felt sufficiently trained to recognize a deteriorating child, their perceived ability to actively manage life-threatening events was inferior to their theoretical understanding of how to resuscitate a child. A high degree of institutional confidence and identification of areas of training need provide a good foundation for customizing future continuing education programs.
Keywords
airway, arrhythmias, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emergency, life-threatening situation, preparedness, shock, training needs
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
07/03/2022 11:52
Last modification date
23/01/2024 7:28
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