Effects of postmortem delays on protein composition and oxidation.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_733906CEAF9C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Effects of postmortem delays on protein composition and oxidation.
Journal
Brain Research Bulletin
Author(s)
ElHajj Z., Cachot A., Müller T., Riederer I.M., Riederer B.M.
ISSN
1873-2747 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0361-9230
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
121
Pages
98-104
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Human autopsy brain tissue is widely used to study neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other diseases. However, when it comes to an evaluation of data obtained from such tissue, it is essential to consider potential postmortem effects on protein composition, posttranslational modification and proteolysis with increasing postmortem delays. In this study, we analyzed mouse brain tissues with different postmortem delays (pmd) of 0h, 6h and 24h, for changes in protein composition, proteolysis and modifications such as S-nitrosylation, carbonylation and ubiquitination. Proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) were of special interest, including cytoskeletal and synaptic proteins or proteins involved in inflammation. Several proteins were fairly resistant to degradation during the first 6h but started to degrade thereafter. S-nitrosylation and carbonylation showed not much variation, except for those proteins that were susceptible to degradation. Brain spectrin was S-nitrosylated at death, and S-nitrosylated degradation fragments were measured at a pmd of 24h, indicating a susceptibility of brain spectrin to degradation. Furthermore, the physiological role of S-nitrosylation remains to be investigated. When studying human brain tissue, some proteins are more susceptible to degradation than others, while ubiquitination and carbonylation were little affected during the first 24h after death.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
03/06/2016 17:59
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:31
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