Percentage, bacterial etiology and antibiotic susceptibility of acute respiratory infection and pneumonia among children in rural Senegal

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It was possible to publish this article open access thanks to a Swiss National Licence with the publisher.
Serval ID
serval:BIB_733012D68E66
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Percentage, bacterial etiology and antibiotic susceptibility of acute respiratory infection and pneumonia among children in rural Senegal
Journal
Journal of Tropical Pediatrics
Author(s)
Echave  P., Bille  J., Audet  C., Talla  I., Vaudaux  B., Gehri  M.
ISSN
0142-6338 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2003
Volume
49
Number
1
Pages
28-32
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Feb
Abstract
Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are still a major health problem in most developing countries. So far no study has evaluated the importance of childhood ARI in rural Senegal. We prospectively studied ARI, the percentage of pneumonia and related mortality, as well as the bacterial composition of nasopharyngeal flora using nasopharyngeal aspirates in 114 children, aged 2-59 months, presenting at Ndioum's pediatric ward. Excluded from the trial were those children that had had antimicrobial therapy in the previous 2 weeks. The Kirby-Bauer method was used to determine antibiotic resistance throughout the study. The percentage of ARI and pneumonia among the population tested was 24 per cent and 11 per cent respectively. Streptococcus pneumonia was often resistant to cotrimoxazole (31 per cent) but only 9 per cent were resistant to chloramphenicol and 14 per cent to penicillin. Haemophilus influenzae (HI) was uniformly sensitive to ampicillin, and only 4 per cent were resistant to chloramphenicol and 11 per cent to cotrimoxazole. We conclude that SP and HI resistance to cotrimoxazole is important and warrants larger clinical trials using chloramphenicol. Information campaigns and intense management of comorbidities are desirable in this type of population. Comorbidities (tuberculosis, malaria, HIV-AIDS, severe malnutrition) are determinant variables in many ARI cases and carry a high negative prognosis value.
Keywords
Acute Disease Child, Preschool *Drug Resistance, Bacterial Female Haemophilus influenzae/drug effects/*isolation & purification/pathogenicity Humans Infant Male Microbial Sensitivity Tests Pneumonia/*epidemiology/mortality Prospective Studies Respiratory Tract Infections/*epidemiology/microbiology *Rural Health Senegal/epidemiology Streptococcus pneumoniae/drug effects/*isolation & purification/pathogenicity
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
25/01/2008 10:33
Last modification date
25/09/2019 6:09
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