Thermogenic response to an oral glucose load in man: comparison between young and elderly subjects.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_730EDB70A84C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Thermogenic response to an oral glucose load in man: comparison between young and elderly subjects.
Journal
Journal of the American College of Nutrition
Author(s)
Bloesch D., Schutz Y., Breitenstein E., Jéquier E., Felber J.P.
ISSN
0731-5724 (Print)
ISSN-L
0731-5724
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1988
Volume
7
Number
6
Pages
471-483
Language
english
Abstract
To investigate the effect of age and change in body composition on the increase in energy expenditure consecutive to the ingestion of a 75-g glucose load, respiratory exchange measurements were performed on 24 subjects, 12 elderly (mean +/- SEM, 73 +/- 1 yr) and 12 young (25 +/- 1 yr). The body weight was comparable, 62 +/- 2 kg in the elderly group vs 61 +/- 3 in the young, but the body fat content of the elderly group was significantly greater than that of the young (29 +/- 2% vs 19 +/- 2%, p less than 0.001). The elderly group presented a slight glucose intolerance according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, with a 120-min plasma glucose of 149 +/- 9 mg/dl (p less than 0.005 vs young). The postabsorptive resting energy expenditure (REE) was 0.83 +/- 0.03 kcal/min in the elderly group vs 0.98 +/- 0.04 in the young (p less than 0.02); this decrease of 15% was mainly related to the decrease in fat free mass (FFM) in the elderly group, which averaged 14%. The difference was not significant when REE was expressed per kg FFM. The glucose-induced thermogenesis (GIT) expressed as percent of energy content of the load was 6.2 +/- 0.6% in the elderly group and 8.9 +/- 0.9% in the young (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that the glucose-induced thermogenesis is decreased in elderly subjects. However, when expressed per kg FFM, the increment in energy expenditure (EE), in response to the glucose load, is not different in elderly subjects, suggesting that the decrease of thermogenesis may be attributed to the age-related decrease in FFM.
Keywords
Administration, Oral, Adult, Aged, Aging/physiology, Blood Glucose/metabolism, Body Composition, Body Temperature Regulation, Energy Metabolism, Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/blood, Female, Glucose/administration & dosage, Humans, Insulin/blood, Male, Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
21/01/2008 13:09
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:31
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