Genomic evolution of ST228 SCCmec-I MRSA 10 years after a major nosocomial outbreak.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_729009233F3E
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Genomic evolution of ST228 SCCmec-I MRSA 10 years after a major nosocomial outbreak.
Journal
Journal of clinical microbiology
Author(s)
Mauffrey F., Bertelli C., Greub G., Senn L., Blanc D.S.
ISSN
1098-660X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0095-1137
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
In this study, we investigated the genomic changes in a major methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clone following a significant outbreak at a hospital. Whole-genome sequencing of MRSA isolates was utilized to explore the genomic evolution of post-outbreak MRSA strains. The epidemicity of the clone declined over time, coinciding with the introduction of multimodal infection control measures. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified multiple genes significantly associated with either high or low epidemic success, indicating alterations in mobilome, virulence, and defense mechanisms. Random Forest models pinpointed a gene related to fibrinogen binding as the most influential predictor of epidemicity. The decline of the MRSA clone may be attributed to various factors, including the implementation of new infection control measures, single nucleotide polymorphisms accumulation, and the genetic drift of a given clone. This research underscores the complex dynamics of MRSA clones, emphasizing the multifactorial nature of their evolution. The decline in epidemicity seems linked to alterations in the clone's genetic profile, with a probable shift towards decreased virulence and adaptation to long-term carriage. Understanding the genomic basis for the decline of epidemic clones is crucial to develop effective strategies for their surveillance and management, as well as to gain insights into the evolutionary dynamics of pathogen genomes.
Keywords
MRSA, THD, genomics, outbreak, random forest
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
05/07/2024 11:08
Last modification date
16/07/2024 7:09
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