Long-term pathogenic response to Plasmodium relictum infection in Culex pipiens mosquito.

Details

Ressource 1Download: journal.pone.0192315.pdf (1001.14 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_7205679F9800
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Long-term pathogenic response to Plasmodium relictum infection in Culex pipiens mosquito.
Journal
PLoS One
Author(s)
Pigeault R., Villa M.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
13
Number
2
Pages
e0192315
Language
english
Abstract
The transmission of Plasmodium within a vertebrate host population is strongly associated with the life history traits of its vector. Therefore the effect of malaria infection on mosquito fecundity and longevity has traditionally received a lot of attention. Several species of malaria parasites reduce mosquito fecundity, nevertheless almost all of the studies have focused only on the first gonotrophic cycle. Yet, during their lifetime, female mosquitoes go through several gonotrophic cycles, which raises the question of whether they are able to compensate the fecundity costs induced by the parasite. The impact of Plasmodium infection on female longevity is not so clear and has produced conflicting results. Here we measured the impact of Plasmodium relictum on its vector's longevity and fecundity during three consecutive gonotrophic cycles. In accordance with previous studies, we observed a negative impact of Plasmodium infection on mosquito (Culex pipiens) fecundity in the first gonotrophic cycle. Interestingly, despite having taken two subsequent uninfected blood meals, the negative impact of malaria parasite persisted. Nevertheless no impact of infection on mosquito longevity was observed. Our results are not in line with the hypothesis that the reduction of fecundity observed in infected mosquitoes is an adaptive strategy of Plasmodium to increase the longevity of its vector. We discuss the different underlying mechanisms that may explain our results.

Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
22/02/2018 16:44
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:30
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