Secondary transfer of organic gunshot residues: Empirical data to assist the evaluation of three scenarios.

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Ressource 1Download: Gassner et al. (2018) secondary transfer (in press).pdf (520.03 [Ko])
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Version: author
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_71CD0CA7F673
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Secondary transfer of organic gunshot residues: Empirical data to assist the evaluation of three scenarios.
Journal
Science & justice
Author(s)
Gassner A.L., Manganelli M., Werner D., Rhumorbarbe D., Maitre M., Beavis A., Roux C.P., Weyermann C.
ISSN
1355-0306 (Print)
ISSN-L
1355-0306
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
59
Number
1
Pages
58-66
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The present study aimed at providing data to assess the secondary transfer of organic gunshot residues (OGSR). Three scenarios were evaluated in controlled conditions, namely displacing a firearm from point A to point B, a simple handshake and an arrest involving handcuffing on the ground. Specimens were collected from the firearm, the hands of the shooter and the non-shooter undergoing the secondary transfer in order to compare the amounts detected. Secondary transfer was observed for the three scenarios, but to a different extent. It was found that displacing a firearm resulted in secondary transfer in <50% of the experiments. The firearm also had an influence, as contrary to the pistol, no secondary OGSR were detected using the revolver. Shaking the hand of the shooter also transferred OGSR to the non-shooter's hand. In that case, the amount of OGSR was generally higher on the shooter than on the non-shooter. Finally, the largest secondary transfer was observed after the arrest with handcuffing with positive results in all cases using the pistol. In that scenario, the amounts on the shooter and the non-shooter were in the same range. This study highlights that the secondary transfer must be taken into account in the interpretation of OGSR. Indeed, an individual's hands might be contaminated by handling a firearm or having physical contact with a shooter.
Keywords
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Firearms, Forensic Ballistics/methods, Hand, Humans, Law Enforcement/methods, Skin/chemistry, Specimen Handling, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Firearm discharge residues, LC-MS/MS, Stubs
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
06/09/2018 15:02
Last modification date
30/01/2020 7:20
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