Rapid increase in plasma tenascin-C concentration after isolated limb perfusion with high-dose tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon gamma (IFN gamma) and melphalan for regionally advanced tumors

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_7186771F86B7
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Rapid increase in plasma tenascin-C concentration after isolated limb perfusion with high-dose tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon gamma (IFN gamma) and melphalan for regionally advanced tumors
Journal
International Journal of Cancer
Author(s)
Schienk  S., Lienard  D., Gerain  J., Baumgartner  M., Lejeune  F. J., Chiquet-Ehrismann  R., Ruegg  C.
ISSN
0020-7136 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
11/1995
Volume
63
Number
5
Pages
665-72
Notes
Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Nov 27
Abstract
The matrix protein tenascin-C (TN-C) is present in the blood of healthy individuals at concentrations around 1 mg/l. Elevated serum levels have been reported in cancer patients. In this study we have measured the concentration of circulating TN-C in 40 patients with melanoma, soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) or squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC) of the limbs, and have found a minor increase in the mean concentration compared with healthy subjects. Only 10 patients had TN-C levels above the normal range. No correlation was observed between TN-C levels and tumor burden. Nineteen patients were treated by isolation limb perfusion (ILP) with TNF, IFN gamma, melphalan (11 melanoma, 2 SCC and I STS), melphalan alone (3 melanoma) or hyperthermia at 41.5 degrees C (2 melanoma). ILP with TNF, IFN gamma and melphalan induced a rapid increase in plasma TN-C levels, peaking in most patients between 24 or 48 hr after ILP. Two patients treated with hyperthermia only had a slow increase in TN-C concentration peaking at day 4, while the patients treated with melphalan alone had no significant change. In some cases elevated TN-C levels persisted for over 8 weeks after ILP. The early rise in TN-C concentration correlates with the increase in circulating C-reactive protein. Our findings suggest that circulating TN-C behaves, at least in part, as an acute-phase protein and that it may play a role in the inflammatory response.
Keywords
Adult Aged Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/*administration & dosage/adverse effects Blood Platelets/drug effects C-Reactive Protein/metabolism Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/blood/drug therapy Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion Dose-Response Relationship, Drug *Extremities Female Humans Interferon-gamma, Recombinant/administration & dosage Interleukin-6/blood Liver Diseases/chemically induced Male Melanoma/blood/drug therapy/secondary Melphalan/administration & dosage Middle Aged Neoplasms/*blood/*drug therapy Sarcoma/blood/drug therapy Soft Tissue Neoplasms/blood/drug therapy Tenascin/*blood Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/administration & dosage/metabolism
Pubmed
Create date
28/01/2008 8:36
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:30
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