Gestational age and gender influence on executive control and its related neural structures in preterm-born children at 6 years of age

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State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Serval ID
serval:BIB_70739C7E21A2
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Gestational age and gender influence on executive control and its related neural structures in preterm-born children at 6 years of age
Journal
Child Neuropsychology
Author(s)
Urben Sébastien, Van Hanswijck De Jonge Laurence, Barisnikov Koviljka, Pizzo Roxane, Monnier Maryline, Lazeyras François, Borradori Tolsa Cristina, Hüppi Petra S.
ISSN
0929-7049
1744-4136
ISSN-L
0929-7049
Publication state
Published
Issued date
17/02/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
23
Number
2
Pages
188-207
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Within preterm-born children, being born male and at a lower gestational age (GA) have both been associated with a heightened risk for developmental difficulties. However, in this population little is known about the combined effect and the influence of these risk factors on cortical structures and executive control. In the present study, 58 preterm-born children (GA ranging from 24.0 to 35.1 weeks) were administered the computerized Child Attention Network Task at 6 years of age. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed and analyzed using Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) in all children. At a behavioral level, boys born <28 weeks of GA had significantly less executive control than preterm-born girls <28 weeks (p = .001) and preterm-born boys ≥28 (p = .003). The reduced executive control in preterm-born boys <28 weeks gestation was related to lower cortical densities in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The current study links the higher incidence of reduced executive control in preterm-born boys to a higher degree of prematurity (low GA) and identifies brain structural abnormalities in the prefrontal cortex related to these deficits. The implications of these results are discussed.

Keywords
Brain/anatomy & histology, Child, Executive Function/physiology, Female, Gender Identity, Gestational Age, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature/physiology, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Brain structure, Executive control abilities, Gender differences, Level of prematurity, Preterm-born children, Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health, Developmental and Educational Psychology, Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
27/10/2015 17:50
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:29
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