Adaptations in muscle oxidative capacity, fiber size, and oxygen supply capacity after repeated-sprint training in hypoxia combined with chronic hypoxic exposure.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_6E88F262416A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Adaptations in muscle oxidative capacity, fiber size, and oxygen supply capacity after repeated-sprint training in hypoxia combined with chronic hypoxic exposure.
Journal
Journal of applied physiology
Author(s)
van der Zwaard S., Brocherie F., Kom BLG, Millet G.P., Deldicque L., van der Laarse W.J., Girard O., Jaspers R.T.
ISSN
1522-1601 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0161-7567
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/06/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
124
Number
6
Pages
1403-1412
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
In this study, we investigate adaptations in muscle oxidative capacity, fiber size and oxygen supply capacity in team-sport athletes after six repeated-sprint sessions in normobaric hypoxia or normoxia combined with 14 days of chronic normobaric hypoxic exposure. Lowland elite field hockey players resided at simulated altitude (≥14 h/day at 2,800-3,000 m) and performed regular training plus six repeated-sprint sessions in normobaric hypoxia (3,000 m; LHTLH; n = 6) or normoxia (0 m; LHTL; n = 6) or lived at sea level with regular training only (LLTL; n = 6). Muscle biopsies were obtained from the m. vastus lateralis before (pre), immediately after (post-1), and 3 wk after the intervention (post-2). Changes over time between groups were compared, including likelihood of the effect size (ES). Succinate dehydrogenase activity in LHTLH largely increased from pre to post-1 (~35%), likely more than LHTL and LLTL (ESs = large-very large), and remained elevated in LHTLH at post-2 (~12%) vs. LHTL (ESs = moderate-large). Fiber cross-sectional area remained fairly similar in LHTLH from pre to post-1 and post-2 but was increased at post-1 and post-2 in LHTL and LLTL (ES = moderate-large). A unique observation was that LHTLH and LHTL, but not LLTL, improved their combination of fiber size and oxidative capacity. Small-to-moderate differences in oxygen supply capacity (i.e., myoglobin and capillarization) were observed between groups. In conclusion, elite team-sport athletes substantially increased their skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, while maintaining fiber size, after only 14 days of chronic hypoxic residence combined with six repeated-sprint training sessions in hypoxia. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our novel findings show that elite team-sport athletes were able to substantially increase the skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in type I and II fibers (+37 and +32%, respectively), while maintaining fiber size after only 14 days of chronic hypoxic residence combined with six repeated-sprint sessions in hypoxia. This increase in oxidative capacity was superior to groups performing chronic hypoxic residence with repeated sprints in normoxia and residence at sea level with regular training only.
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological, Adult, Athletes, Humans, Hypoxia/metabolism, Male, Mitochondria, Muscle/metabolism, Muscle, Skeletal/cytology, Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism, Running/physiology, Young Adult, altitude training, angiogenesis, hypertrophy, oxygen transport, skeletal muscle
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
09/02/2018 21:59
Last modification date
16/11/2019 6:16
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