A new look at atrial fibrillation: lessons learned from drugs, pacing, and ablation therapies.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_6C1C39BDC7A8
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
A new look at atrial fibrillation: lessons learned from drugs, pacing, and ablation therapies.
Journal
European Heart Journal
Author(s)
Kappenberger L.
ISSN
1522-9645 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0195-668X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Volume
34
Number
35
Pages
2739-2745
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish Document Type: Review
The René Laënnec lecture on clinical cardiology
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and among the leading causes of stroke and heart failure in Western populations. Despite the increasing size of clinical trials assessing the efficacy and safety of AF therapies, achieved outcomes have not always matched expectations. Considering that AF is a symptom of many possible underlying diseases, clinical research for this arrhythmia should take into account their respective pathophysiology. Accordingly, the definition of the study populations to be included should rely on the established as well as on the new classifications of AF and take advantage from a differentiated look at the AF-electrocardiogram and from increasingly large spectrum of biomarkers. Such an integrated approach could bring researchers and treating physicians one step closer to the ultimate vision of personalized therapy, which, in this case, means an AF therapy based on refined diagnostic elements in accordance with scientific evidence gathered from clinical trials. By applying clear-cut patient inclusion criteria, future studies will be of smaller size and thus of lower cost. In addition, the findings from such studies will be of greater predictive value at the individual patient level, allowing for pinpointed therapeutic decisions in daily practice.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/10/2013 16:58
Last modification date
01/10/2019 6:18
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