AltitudeOmics: Spontaneous Baroreflex Sensitivity During Acclimatization to 5,260 m: A Comparison of Methods

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_6B7553908B73
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
AltitudeOmics: Spontaneous Baroreflex Sensitivity During Acclimatization to 5,260 m: A Comparison of Methods
Journal
Frontiers in Physiology
Author(s)
Bourdillon Nicolas, Yazdani Sasan, Vesin Jean-Marc, Subudhi Andrew W., Lovering Andrew T., Roach Robert C., Kayser Bengt
ISSN
1664-042X
ISSN-L
1664-042X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
10/12/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
10
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is essential to ensure rapid adjustment to variations in blood pressure (BP). Spontaneous baroreflex function can be assessed using continuous recordings of blood pressure. The goal of this study was to compare four methods for BRS quantification [the sequence, Bernardi's (BER), frequency and transfer function methods] to identify the most consistent method across an extreme range of conditions: rest and exercise, in normoxia, hypoxia, hypocapnia, and hypercapnia.
Using intra-radial artery BP in young healthy participants, BRS was calculated and compared using the four methods in normoxia, acute and chronic hypoxia (terrestrial altitude of 5,260 m) in hypocapnia (hyperventilation), hypercapnia (rebreathing) and during ramp exercise to exhaustion.
The sequence and BER methods for BRS estimation showed good agreement during the resting and exercise protocols, whilst the ultra- and very-low frequency bands of the frequency and transfer function methods were more discrepant. Removing respiratory frequency from the blood pressure traces affected primarily the sequence and BER methods and occasionally the frequency and transfer function methods.
The sequence and BER methods contained more respiratory related information than the frequency and transfer function methods, indicating that the former two methods predominantly rely on respiratory effects of BRS. BER method is recommended because it is the easiest to compute and even though it tends to overestimate BRS compared to the sequence method, it is consistent with the other methods, whilst its interquartile range is the smallest.
Keywords
Physiology (medical), Physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation
University of Lausanne
Create date
14/12/2019 8:11
Last modification date
03/03/2021 7:25
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