Is nurse-measured blood pressure a valid substitute for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring?

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_6B1FBD2DE4CA
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Is nurse-measured blood pressure a valid substitute for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring?
Journal
Blood pressure monitoring
Author(s)
Gerc V., Favrat B., Brunner H.R., Burnier M.
ISSN
1359-5237
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2000
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
5
Number
4
Pages
203-9
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article - Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Because ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is not available everywhere, the objective of the study was to determine whether nurse-measured blood pressure could be an acceptable substitute to ABPM. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 2385 consecutive patients referred to our hypertension clinic for the performance of ABPM. Before ambulatory monitoring was performed, a nurse-measured BP was obtained three times using a Y-tube connecting the sphygmomanometer and the recorder. We compared the mean value of the three nurse-measured blood pressures with that of the 12h daytime ambulatory monitoring, considered as the reference. RESULTS: The difference between the nurse-measured and the ambulatory blood pressure was small but statistically significant, indicating that nurse-measured blood pressure tends to overestimate both diastolic and systolic blood pressure. The difference between the nurse blood pressure and ABPM was greater among treated hypertensive patients than untreated patients. To diagnose hypertension, defined as a blood pressure of over 140/90mmHg by ABPM, the positive predictive value of the nurse blood pressure was 0.81 and the negative predictive value 0.63. However, these predictive values could be improved with less stringent cut-off values of blood pressure. Thus, for a diastolic blood pressure above 100mmHg, the positive predictive value of nurse blood pressure was 0.55 and the negative predictive value 0.91. These figures were relatively similar for previously treated and untreated patients. CONCLUSION: Nurse blood pressure is less accurate than ABPM in diagnosing hypertension, defined as a blood pressure of over 140/90mmHg. It could, however, be an acceptable substitute, especially to exclude people who do not need to be treated, in situations where lower resources require a less rigorous definition of hypertension.
Keywords
Adult, Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure Determination, Female, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Statistics as Topic
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
29/02/2008 11:34
Last modification date
09/09/2019 16:24
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