Exposure to Amosite-Containing Ceiling Boards in a Public School in Switzerland: A Case Study.

Details

Ressource 1Download: 2019_Vernez_Amosite_IntJEnvironResPublicHealth_5069.pdf (760.62 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_6B12BC859CCE
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Case report (case report): feedback on an observation with a short commentary.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Exposure to Amosite-Containing Ceiling Boards in a Public School in Switzerland: A Case Study.
Journal
International journal of environmental research and public health
Author(s)
Vernez D., Duperrex O., Herrera H., Perret V., Rossi I., Regamey F., Guillemin M.
ISSN
1660-4601 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1660-4601
Publication state
Published
Issued date
12/12/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
16
Number
24
Pages
5069
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
The measurement of an airborne concentration in Amosite fibers above 5035 F/m <sup>3</sup> in a school prompted a retrospective quantitative health risk assessment. Dose estimates were built using air measurements, laboratory experiments, previous exposure data, and interviews. A dose response model was adapted for amosite-only exposure and adjusted for the life expectancy and lung cancer incidence in the Swiss population. The average yearly concentrations found were 52-320 F/m <sup>3</sup> . The high concentration previously observed was not representative of the average exposure in the building. Overall, the risk estimates for the different populations of the school were low and in the range of 2 × 10 <sup>-6</sup> to 3 × 10 <sup>-5</sup> for mesothelioma and 4 × 10 <sup>-7</sup> to 8 × 10 <sup>-6</sup> for lung cancer. The results evidenced however that children have to be considered at higher risk when exposed to asbestos, and that the current reference method and target values are of limited use for amphibole-only exposures. This study confirmed that quantitative health risk assessments and participatory approaches are powerful tools to support public decisions and build constructive communication between exposed people, experts, and policy-makers.
Keywords
Adolescent, Air Pollutants/analysis, Air Pollution, Indoor/analysis, Asbestos, Amosite/analysis, Child, Construction Materials, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Environmental Monitoring, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Mesothelioma, Risk Assessment, Schools, Switzerland, amosite, asbestos, ceiling boards, health risk assessment, school
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
07/01/2020 18:12
Last modification date
27/04/2020 6:20
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