Abnormalities of fuel utilization as predisposing to the development of obesity in humans.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_6A76FB368A3C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Abnormalities of fuel utilization as predisposing to the development of obesity in humans.
Journal
Obesity Research
Author(s)
Schutz Y.
ISSN
1071-7323 (Print)
ISSN-L
1071-7323
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/1995
Volume
3 Suppl 2
Pages
173S-178S
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
A number of recent investigations in man have demonstrated that a low ratio of fat to carbohydrate oxidation (i.e., a high respiratory quotient or RQ) was associated with actual and/or subsequent body weight gain in obese non-diabetic Pima Indians, in American men of various ages and in post-obese European women investigated shortly after the cessation of a hypocaloric diet. It is well known that numerous exogenous and endogenous factors influence the RQ at rest such as: the level of feeding (positive vs. negative energy balance), the composition of food eaten (high vs. low carbohydrate), the size of the glycogen stores, the amount of adipose tissue as well as genetic factors. It should be stressed that some nutritional situations can co-exist during which a low ratio of fat to carbohydrate is observed (i.e., a high RQ) despite weight loss. Furthermore, in most studies mentioned above, the low fat to carbohydrate oxidation ratio explains less than 10% of the variance in weight gain, suggesting that numerous additional factors also play a substantial role in the onset of weight gain. It is concluded that: 1) a low fat to carbohydrate oxidation ratio or an abnormal fat oxidation is difficult to define quantitatively since it is largely influenced by the energy level and the composition of the diet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Keywords
Carbohydrate Metabolism, Causality, Energy Metabolism/physiology, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Obesity/epidemiology, Obesity/physiopathology, Oxidation-Reduction, Weight Gain/physiology, Weight Loss/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
21/01/2008 13:08
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:25
Usage data