Job stress among GPs: associations with practice organisation in 11 high-income countries.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_6A4A64FE80EA
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Job stress among GPs: associations with practice organisation in 11 high-income countries.
Journal
The British journal of general practice
Author(s)
Cohidon C., Wild P., Senn N.
ISSN
1478-5242 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0960-1643
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
70
Number
698
Pages
e657-e667
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Job stress among GPs is an issue of growing concern.
To investigate whether the structural and organisational features of GPs' practices were associated with job stress in 11 countries.
Secondary analysis of the 2015 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of Primary Care Physicians, an international cross-sectional study. A total of 11 Western countries participated in the 2015 edition.
Random samples of practising GPs were drawn from government or private lists in each country (N = 12 049). Job stress was measured by the question: 'How stressful is your job as a GP?' (5-point Likert scale). Numerous practices' organisation and functioning characteristics were considered. Multilevel mixed-effects ordered logistic regression was performed.
The prevalence of job stress varied from 18% to 59% according to country. Job stress was higher among GPs aged 45-54 years (middle age) (odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07 to 1.70) and those practising in an urban area (OR 1.23, 95% CI = 1.15 to 1.31). It was also associated with a high weekly workload (OR 2.88, 95% CI = 2.38 to 3.50) if >50 hours/week workload, large administrative burden (OR 1.65, 95% CI = 1.44 to 1.89), long delays in receiving hospital discharge, poor possibilities in offering same-day appointments (OR 1.74, 95% CI = 1.18 to 2.56), and performance assessment (OR 1.15, 95% CI = 1.05 to 1.24). Finally, long consultations (OR 0.64, 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.76) and working with a case manager attached to the practice were associated with a lower job stress. The vast majority of results were consistent across the countries.
Heavy workloads and time pressure are clearly associated with GP job stress. However, organisational changes such as employing case managers and allowing longer consultations could potentially reduce this burden.
Keywords
general practitioners, international comparisons, occupational stress, organisational characteristics, primary care
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
23/06/2020 12:31
Last modification date
15/09/2020 6:26
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