Rapid decline of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies following early treatment of incident HCV infections in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_6956BB808421
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Rapid decline of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies following early treatment of incident HCV infections in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.
Journal
HIV medicine
Author(s)
Aebi-Popp K., Wandeler G., Salazar-Vizcaya L., Metzner K., Stöckle M., Cavassini M., Hoffmann M., Lüthi A., Suter F., Bernasconi E., Fehr J., Furrer H., Rauch A.
Working group(s)
the Swiss HIV Cohort Study
Contributor(s)
Aubert V., Battegay M., Böni J., Braun D.L., Bucher H.C., Calmy A., Ciuffi A., Dollenmaier G., Egger M., Elzi L., Fellay J., Fux C.A., Günthard H.F., Haerry D., Hasse B., Hirsch H.H., Hösli I., Kahlert C., Kaiser L., Keiser O., Klimkait T., Kouyos R.D., Kovari H., Ledergerber B., Martinetti G., Martinez de Tejada B., Marzolini C., Müller N., Nicca D., Pantaleo G., Paioni P., Rauch A., Rudin C., Scherrer A.U., Schmid P., Speck R., Tarr P., Trkola A., Vernazza P., Weber R., Yerly S.
ISSN
1468-1293 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1464-2662
Publication state
Published
Issued date
07/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
19
Number
6
Pages
420-425
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Observational Study ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Following clearance of incident hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, HCV antibody levels may decline, resulting in seroreversion. It is unclear to what extent HCV antibody level trajectories differ between patients with treatment-induced sustained virological response (SVR), those with spontaneous clearance and those with untreated replicating HCV infection. We investigated HCV antibody level dynamics in HIV-infected MSM with different clinical outcomes.
We investigated anti-HCV antibody level dynamics following an incident HCV infection in 67 HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) with different clinical outcomes: SVR (n = 33), spontaneous clearance (n = 12), and untreated replicating infection (n = 22). Antibody levels were measured at the time of HCV diagnosis, and at yearly intervals for 3 years thereafter.
At baseline, median HCV antibody levels were similar in the three groups: 13.4, 13.8 and 13.5 sample to cut-off (S/CO) for SVR, spontaneous clearance and untreated infection, respectively. Over 3 years of follow-up, SVR was associated with a more pronounced decrease in anti-HCV levels compared with spontaneous clearance and untreated infection [median decline 71% [interquartile range (IQR: 43-87%), 38% (IQR: 29-60%) and 12% (IQR: 9-22%), respectively; P < 0.001]. Seroreversions occurred in five of 33 (15%) patients with SVR and in one of 12 (8%) with spontaneous clearance. A shorter delay between time of infection and treatment start correlated with higher rates of decline in antibody levels. Seven patients experienced a reinfection.
Treatment-induced HCV clearance was associated with a more pronounced decline in anti-HCV antibody levels and with higher rates of seroreversion compared with spontaneous clearance or untreated replicating HCV infection among HIV-infected MSM with incident HCV infections. Rapid clearance of HCV RNA following early HCV treatment might impair the development of persistent antibody titres.
Keywords
Adult, Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use, Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use, Coinfection, Drug Therapy, Combination, Follow-Up Studies, HIV Infections/complications, HIV Infections/drug therapy, HIV Infections/immunology, Hepatitis C/complications, Hepatitis C/drug therapy, Hepatitis C/immunology, Hepatitis C Antibodies/drug effects, Hepatitis C Antibodies/immunology, Homosexuality, Male, Humans, Male, Remission, Spontaneous, Sustained Virologic Response, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Viral Load, Virus Replication/immunology, HIV, antibody titres, hepatitis C virus, seroreversions, viral clearance
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
29/03/2018 18:12
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:24
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