Population-level changes to promote cardiovascular health.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_692CDC7D05D7
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Population-level changes to promote cardiovascular health.
Journal
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Author(s)
Jørgensen T., Capewell S., Prescott E., Allender S., Sans S., Zdrojewski T., De Bacquer D., de Sutter J., Franco O.H., Løgstrup S., Volpe M., Malyutina S., Marques-Vidal P., Reiner Z., Tell G.S., Verschuren W.M., Vanuzzo D., PEP section of EACPR
Contributor(s)
PEP section of EACPR
ISSN
2047-4881 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2047-4873
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
20
Number
3
Pages
409-421
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) cause 1.8 million premature (<75 years) death annually in Europe. The majority of these deaths are preventable with the most efficient and cost-effective approach being on the population level. The aim of this position paper is to assist authorities in selecting the most adequate management strategies to prevent CVD.
DESIGN AND METHODS: Experts reviewed and summarized the published evidence on the major modifiable CVD risk factors: food, physical inactivity, smoking, and alcohol. Population-based preventive strategies focus on fiscal measures (e.g. taxation), national and regional policies (e.g. smoke-free legislation), and environmental changes (e.g. availability of alcohol).
RESULTS: Food is a complex area, but several strategies can be effective in increasing fruit and vegetables and lowering intake of salt, saturated fat, trans-fats, and free sugars. Tobacco and alcohol can be regulated mainly by fiscal measures and national policies, but local availability also plays a role. Changes in national policies and the built environment will integrate physical activity into daily life.
CONCLUSION: Societal changes and commercial influences have led to the present unhealthy environment, in which default option in life style increases CVD risk. A challenge for both central and local authorities is, therefore, to ensure healthier defaults. This position paper summarizes the evidence and recommends a number of structural strategies at international, national, and regional levels that in combination can substantially reduce CVD.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
23/04/2012 9:17
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:24
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