Predator-induced maternal effects determine adaptive antipredator behaviors via egg composition.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_6805DA99A686
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Predator-induced maternal effects determine adaptive antipredator behaviors via egg composition.
Journal
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Author(s)
Sharda S., Zuest T., Erb M., Taborsky B.
ISSN
1091-6490 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0027-8424
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
118
Number
37
Pages
e2017063118
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
In high-risk environments with frequent predator encounters, efficient antipredator behavior is key to survival. Parental effects are a powerful mechanism to prepare offspring for coping with such environments, yet clear evidence for adaptive parental effects on offspring antipredator behaviors is missing. Rapid escape reflexes, or "C-start reflexes," are a key adaptation in fish and amphibians to escape predator strikes. We hypothesized that mothers living in high-risk environments might induce faster C-start reflexes in offspring by modifying egg composition. Here, we show that offspring of the cichlid fish Neolamprologus pulcher developed faster C-start reflexes and were more risk averse if their parents had been exposed to cues of their most dangerous natural predator during egg production. This effect was mediated by differences in egg composition. Eggs of predator-exposed mothers were heavier with higher net protein content, and the resulting offspring were heavier and had lower igf-1 gene expression than control offspring shortly after hatching. Thus, changes in egg composition can relay multiple putative pathways by which mothers can influence adaptive antipredator behaviors such as faster escape reflexes.
Keywords
C-start response, antipredator response, developmental plasticity, egg size, maternal effects
Pubmed
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation
Create date
21/09/2021 10:58
Last modification date
12/10/2021 6:10
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