Metastatic tumors to the colon and rectum: a multi-institutional study.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_67CF7C26FDF3
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Metastatic tumors to the colon and rectum: a multi-institutional study.
Journal
Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Author(s)
Mourra N., Jouret-Mourin A., Lazure T., Audard V., Albiges L., Malbois M., Bouzourene H., Duvillard P.
ISSN
1543-2165 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0003-9985
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Volume
136
Number
11
Pages
1397-1401
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Context.-Unlike the small bowel, the colorectal mucosa is seldom the site of metastatic disease. Objective.-To determine the incidence of truly colorectal metastases, and subsequent clinicopathologic findings, in a substantial colorectal cancer population collected from 7 European centers. Design.-During the last decade, 10 365 patients were identified as having colorectal malignant tumors, other than systemic diseases. Data collected included patient demographics, clinical symptoms, treatment, the presence of metastases in other sites, disease-free interval, follow-up, and overall survival. All secondary tumors resulting from direct invasion from malignant tumors of the contiguous organs were excluded, as well as those resulting from lymph node metastases or peritoneal seeding. Results.-Only 35 patients were included (10 men) with a median age of 59 years. They presented with obstruction, bleeding, abdominal pain, or perforation. The leading source of metastases was the breast, followed by melanoma. Metastases were synchronous in 3 cases. The mean disease-free interval for the remaining cases was 6.61 years. Surgical resection was performed in 28 cases. Follow-up was available for 26 patients; all had died, with a mean survival time of 10.67 months (range, 1-41 months). Conclusions.-Colorectal metastases are exceptional (0.338%) with the breast as a leading source of metastases; they still represent a late stage of disease and reflect a poor prognosis. Therefore, the pathologist should be alert for the possibility of secondary tumors when studying large bowel biopsies. Any therapy is usually palliative, but our results suggest that prolonged survival after surgery and complementary therapy can be obtained in some patients.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
20/12/2012 18:50
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:23
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