Vision- and touch-dependent brain correlates of body-related mental processing.

Details

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_6746AE05CE06
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Vision- and touch-dependent brain correlates of body-related mental processing.
Journal
Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior
Author(s)
Pamplona GSP, Hardmeier M., Younes S., Goy I., Fornari E., Ionta S.
ISSN
1973-8102 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0010-9452
Publication state
Published
Issued date
12/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
157
Pages
30-52
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
In humans, the nature of sensory input influences body-related mental processing. For instance, behavioral differences (e.g., response time) can be found between mental spatial transformations (e.g., mental rotation) of viewed and touched body parts. It can thus be hypothesized that distinct brain activation patterns are associated with such sensory-dependent body-related mental processing. However, direct evidence that the neural correlates of body-related mental processing can be modulated by the nature of the sensory stimuli is still missing. We thus analyzed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from thirty-one healthy participants performing mental rotation of visually- (images) and haptically-presented (plastic) hands. We also dissociated the neural activity related to rotation or task-related performance using models that either regressed out or included the variance associated with response time. Haptically-mediated mental rotation recruited mostly the sensorimotor brain network. Visually-mediated mental rotation led to parieto-occipital activations. In addition, faster mental rotation was associated with sensorimotor activity, while slower mental rotation was associated with parieto-occipital activations. The fMRI results indicated that changing the type of sensory inputs modulates the neural correlates of body-related mental processing. These findings suggest that distinct sensorimotor brain dynamics can be exploited to execute similar tasks depending on the available sensory input. The present study can contribute to a better evaluation of body-related mental processing in experimental and clinical settings.
Keywords
Humans, Brain/diagnostic imaging, Brain/physiology, Mental Processes, Reaction Time/physiology, Brain Mapping, Hand/physiology, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, BOLD-Response time analysis, Mental rotation, Multisensory, Sensorimotor, Sensory substitution, Visual/motor imagery
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
02/11/2022 9:50
Last modification date
17/07/2024 12:28
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