Embodying health behaviours in everyday life: the social and gendered practices of female senior managers.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_665020C60C17
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Embodying health behaviours in everyday life: the social and gendered practices of female senior managers.
Journal
Psychology & health
Author(s)
Del Río Carral M., Lyons A.
ISSN
1476-8321 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0887-0446
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Pages
1-19
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Objective: This article extends current theorising around health behaviours using insights from a study with women working in senior management positions in Switzerland. The study aimed to explore the meanings they attached to their everyday activities and examine implications for health and wellbeing by drawing on 1) social practices theory, 2) a socio-constructionist approach to gender, and 3) conceptualisations of embodiment.Design: Twenty female senior managers were interviewed at two time points six months apart: the first interview elicited highly-detailed, descriptive accounts of activities during the previous day, while in the second interview participants reflected on their previous accounts and discussed the meanings they ascribed to their activities. A thematic and narrative analysis of both sets of transcripts was conducted.Results: Three main themes captured the ways female senior managers talked about their everyday behaviours, all focused around their bodies: 'Functional bodies: Being on-the-go and meeting responsibilities'; 'Limiting bodies: Threats to everyday activities'; and 'Intentional bodies: Activities for wellbeing'.Conclusions: Results are considered in terms of contemporary postfeminist/neoliberal discourses in Western societies, how these are shaping and affecting everyday practices and subjectivities, and their consequences for women's health and wellbeing at work.
Keywords
Embodiment, health behaviours, neoliberalism, postfeminism, professional identity, social practices
Pubmed
Create date
04/04/2020 16:25
Last modification date
09/04/2020 7:09
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