Comparative genomics reveals contraction in olfactory receptor genes in bats.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_66353CA228EE
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Comparative genomics reveals contraction in olfactory receptor genes in bats.
Journal
Scientific Reports
Author(s)
Tsagkogeorga G., Müller S., Dessimoz C., Rossiter S.J.
ISSN
2045-2322 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2045-2322
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
7
Number
1
Pages
259
Language
english
Abstract
Gene loss and gain during genome evolution are thought to play important roles in adaptive phenotypic diversification. Among mammals, bats possess the smallest genomes and have evolved the unique abilities of powered flight and laryngeal echolocation. To investigate whether gene family evolution has contributed to the genome downsizing and phenotypic diversification in this group, we performed comparative evolutionary analyses of complete proteome data for eight bat species, including echolocating and non-echolocating forms, together with the proteomes of 12 other laurasiatherian mammals. Our analyses revealed extensive gene loss in the most recent ancestor of bats, and also of carnivores (both >1,000 genes), although this gene contraction did not appear to correlate with the reduction in genome size in bats. Comparisons of highly dynamic families suggested that expansion and contraction affected genes with similar functions (immunity, response to stimulus) in all laurasiatherian lineages. However, the magnitude and direction of these changes varied greatly among groups. In particular, our results showed contraction of the Olfactory Receptor (OR) gene repertoire in the last common ancestor of all bats, as well as that of the echolocating species studied. In contrast, non-echolocating fruit bats showed evidence of expansion in ORs, supporting a "trade-off" between sensory modalities.

Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
23/03/2017 22:27
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:22
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