Determinants of body weight gain and association with neurodevelopmental outcome in infants operated for congenital heart disease.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_65F156DB0BDC
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Determinants of body weight gain and association with neurodevelopmental outcome in infants operated for congenital heart disease.
Journal
Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
Author(s)
Knirsch W., Zingg W., Bernet V., Balmer C., Dimitropoulos A., Prêtre R., Bauersfeld U., Latal B.
ISSN
1569-9285 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1569-9285
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
10
Number
3
Pages
377-382
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The aim of this prospective study was to examine the determinants of growth failure and the association with neurodevelopmental outcome in infants undergoing open-heart surgery. In 107 infants undergoing open-heart surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD), we evaluated weight at birth, at surgery, and at one year of age (expressed as z-scores). Neurodevelopmental status was assessed before surgery and at one year of age. Median age at surgery was 3.9 months (range: 0.1-10.2). Mean [+/-standard deviation (S.D.)] weight z-score at birth was -0.27 (+/-1.45), before surgery -1.34 (+/-1.45) (P<0.001 vs. birth weight), and at one year -0.86 (+/-1.35), (P<0.001 vs. weight at surgery). Poor preoperative weight (<10th percentile) was associated with genetic disorders [odds ratio (OR) 5.9, P<0.001], preoperative neurological abnormalities (OR 3.41, P<0.05), and older age at surgery (OR 1.01, P<0.05). Weight <10th percentile at one year was associated with the same factors as poor preoperative weight, however, also with risk adjustment for congenital heart surgery-1 (RACHS) score >3 (OR 3.22, P<0.05). Neurodevelopmental outcome at one year was not determined by growth failure. In conclusion, impaired body weight gain before surgery is followed by a catch-up growth after surgery. However, there is no relationship to neurodevelopmental outcome. Genetic comorbidity is the most significant factor for poor weight gain.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
16/12/2014 18:02
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:21
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