Chlorhexidine use in burn patients : cytotoxicity and implications in wound healing

Details

Ressource 1Download: Mémoire no 3270 M. Tornay.pdf (4267.53 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: After imprimatur
Secondary document(s)
Download: Mémoire no 3270 Annexes M. Tornay.pdf (6336.05 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_65BB57551B53
Type
A Master's thesis.
Publication sub-type
Master (thesis) (master)
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Chlorhexidine use in burn patients : cytotoxicity and implications in wound healing
Author(s)
TORNAY D.
Director(s)
LAURENT-APPLEGATE L.
Codirector(s)
HIRT-BURRI N.
Institution details
Université de Lausanne, Faculté de biologie et médecine
Publication state
Accepted
Issued date
2016
Language
english
Number of pages
34
Abstract
The skin is the largest organ of the body and therefore is very important. Composed of stem cells, vessels, nerves glands and hairs the skin has three principal layers. Its role is the protection of the body against injury, infections, heat and light.
By definition, a wound is a traumatic opening in the skin and/or associated organs. It can be an open wound when there is a traumatic rupture of the integument or a contusion when the injury is closed. Burn wounds are caused by contact with hot solid or liquid matter, from flame or scald, by chemicals, electricity and others.
Burn wounds are classified in three degrees which are important for wound management. In the first degree only the epidermis is destroyed. The second degree affects the dermis and is divided in two categories, superficial and deep. In the third degree, the three layers of the skin are completely destroyed. Because of no spontaneous healing possible and risks of infections, third degree burns have to be treated in specialized centers.
After the burn, an inflammation of the wound area occurs. Secondly, keratinocytes and fibroblasts migrate to revascularize and close the wound. A provisional matrix is produced. At the end, myofibroblasts end the closure of the wound and the fibroblasts produce the final matrix made of collagen and elastin.
Major burns also cause a systemic reaction involving cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic and immunological reactions, and thus require specialized care in an intensive care unit.
This is a brief introduction of the skin and burn wounds. In order to understand burn wounds and their treatment, more detailed information is presented in APPENDIX I.
Keywords
chlorhexidine, burn, wound healing, antiseptic, plastic surgery
Create date
05/09/2017 13:11
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:21
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