Movement, impacts and management of plant distributions in response to climate change: insights from invasions

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_654CA4BBE83C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Movement, impacts and management of plant distributions in response to climate change: insights from invasions
Journal
Oikos
Author(s)
Caplat P., Cheptou P.-O., Diez J., Guisan A., Larson B.M.H., MacDougall A.S., Peltzer D.A., Richardson D.M., Shea K., van Kleunen M., Zhang R., Buckley Y.M
ISSN
0030-1299
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
122
Number
9
Pages
1265-1274
Language
english
Abstract
A major challenge in this era of rapid climate change is to predict changes in species distributions and their impacts on ecosystems, and, if necessary, to recommend management strategies for maintenance of biodiversity or ecosystem services. Biological invasions, studied in most biomes of the world, can provide useful analogs for some of the ecological consequences of species distribution shifts in response to climate change. Invasions illustrate the adaptive and interactive responses that can occur when species are confronted with new environmental conditions. Invasion ecology complements climate change research and provides insights into the following questions: i) how will species distributions respond to climate change? ii) how will species movement affect recipient ecosystems? and iii) should we, and if so how can we, manage species and ecosystems in the face of climate change? Invasion ecology demonstrates that a trait-based approach can help to predict spread speeds and impacts on ecosystems, and has the potential to predict climate change impacts on species ranges and recipient ecosystems. However, there is a need to analyse traits in the context of life-history and demography, the stage in the colonisation process (e.g., spread, establishment or impact), the distribution of suitable habitats in the landscape, and the novel abiotic and biotic conditions under which those traits are expressed. As is the case with climate change, invasion ecology is embedded within complex societal goals. Both disciplines converge on similar questions of "when to intervene?" and "what to do?" which call for a better understanding of the ecological processes and social values associated with changing ecosystems.
Keywords
biological invasions, range limits, distributional shifts, assisted colonisation, assisted migration, dispersal
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
25/03/2013 9:09
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:21
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