French Didactics in Late Medieval and Early Modern England: Thinking Historically about Method

Details

Ressource 1Download: Critten2018.pdf (2463.54 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: author
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_6487635EBB82
Type
A part of a book
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
French Didactics in Late Medieval and Early Modern England: Thinking Historically about Method
Title of the book
The History of Language Learning and Teaching: 16th-18th Century Europe
Author(s)
Critten Rory G.
Publisher
Legenda
Address of publication
Oxford
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Editor
McLelland Nicola, Smith Richard
Volume
1
Pages
33-51
Language
english
Abstract
Recent commentators on the history of French education in medieval and early modern England argue that translation played a major part in the instruction of the language across both periods. In contrast, this essay demonstrates that the prevalence of the technique in medieval French teaching is difficult to prove and that monolingual methods of instruction are equally likely to have been pursued, perhaps especially by those French teachers about whom we know the most, the Oxford dictatores. The argument highlights the sensitivity of both medieval and early modern teachers to the shifting material, linguistic, social, and geopolitical conditions that shaped the requirements of their students and defined the possibilities for instruction. As such, it illustrates the usefulness of a history of language learning and teaching that considers method as the product of a series of localized responses to particular teaching situations as well as of a teleological process of refinement and reform.
Keywords
language learning, medieval, French, pedagogy, method
Create date
24/04/2018 8:46
Last modification date
13/03/2021 6:22
Usage data