Bridgehead Effects and Role of Adaptive Evolution in Invasive Populations.

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State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_63CCD9D93877
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Bridgehead Effects and Role of Adaptive Evolution in Invasive Populations.
Journal
Trends in ecology & evolution
Author(s)
Bertelsmeier C., Keller L.
ISSN
1872-8383 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0169-5347
Publication state
Published
Issued date
07/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
33
Number
7
Pages
527-534
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Biological invasions are a major threat to biodiversity, agriculture, and human health. Invasive populations can be the source of additional new introductions, leading to a self-accelerating process whereby invasion begets invasion. This phenomenon, coined bridgehead effect, has been proposed to stem from the evolution of higher invasiveness in a primary introduced population. There is, however, no conclusive evidence that the success of bridgehead populations stems from the evolution of increased invasiveness. Instead, we argue that a high frequency of secondary introductions can be explained by increased abundance in the bridgehead region or the topology of human transport networks. We outline the type of evidence and experiments that are needed to demonstrate adaptive evolution and higher invasion success of introduced populations.
Keywords
Adaptation, Biological, Animals, Biological Evolution, Introduced Species, Plants, adaptation, biological invasions, evolution of invasiveness, globalization
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
06/08/2018 9:49
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:20
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