Prevalence of phase variable epigenetic invertons among host-associated bacteria.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_635B5F07F724
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Prevalence of phase variable epigenetic invertons among host-associated bacteria.
Journal
Nucleic acids research
Author(s)
Huang X., Wang J., Li J., Liu Y., Liu X., Li Z., Kurniyati K., Deng Y., Wang G., Ralph J.D., De Ste Croix M., Escobar-Gonzalez S., Roberts R.J., Veening J.W., Lan X., Oggioni M.R., Li C., Zhang J.R.
ISSN
1362-4962 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0305-1048
Publication state
Published
Issued date
18/11/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
48
Number
20
Pages
11468-11485
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Type I restriction-modification (R-M) systems consist of a DNA endonuclease (HsdR, HsdM and HsdS subunits) and methyltransferase (HsdM and HsdS subunits). The hsdS sequences flanked by inverted repeats (referred to as epigenetic invertons) in certain Type I R-M systems undergo invertase-catalyzed inversions. Previous studies in Streptococcus pneumoniae have shown that hsdS inversions within clonal populations produce subpopulations with profound differences in the methylome, cellular physiology and virulence. In this study, we bioinformatically identified six major clades of the tyrosine and serine family invertases homologs from 16 bacterial phyla, which potentially catalyze hsdS inversions in the epigenetic invertons. In particular, the epigenetic invertons are highly enriched in host-associated bacteria. We further verified hsdS inversions in the Type I R-M systems of four representative host-associated bacteria and found that each of the resultant hsdS allelic variants specifies methylation of a unique DNA sequence. In addition, transcriptome analysis revealed that hsdS allelic variations in Enterococcus faecalis exert significant impact on gene expression. These findings indicate that epigenetic switches driven by invertases in the epigenetic invertons broadly operate in the host-associated bacteria, which may broadly contribute to bacterial host adaptation and virulence beyond the role of the Type I R-M systems against phage infection.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
30/10/2020 11:20
Last modification date
04/02/2021 6:25
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