The nature and composition of the internal environment of the developing brain

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_60651298CC29
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The nature and composition of the internal environment of the developing brain
Journal
Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology
Author(s)
Dziegielewska  K. M., Knott  G. W., Saunders  N. R.
ISSN
0272-4340 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2000
Volume
20
Number
1
Pages
41-56
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review --- Old month value: Feb
Abstract
1. The fetal brain develops within its own environment, which is protected from free exchange of most molecules among its extracellular fluid, blood plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by a set of mechanisms described collectively as "brain barriers." 2. There are high concentrations of proteins in fetal CSF, which are due not to immaturity of the blood-CSF barrier (tight junctions between the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus), but to a specialized transcellular mechanism that specifically transfers some proteins across choroid plexus epithelial cells in the immature brain. 3. The proteins in CSF are excluded from the extracellular fluid of the immature brain by the presence of barriers at the CSF-brain interfaces on the inner and outer surfaces. These barriers are not present in the adult. 4. Some plasma proteins are present within the cells of the developing brain. Their presence may be explained by a combination of specific uptake from the CSF and synthesis in situ. 5. Information about the composition of the CSF (electrolytes as well as proteins) in the developing brain is of importance for the culture conditions used for experiments with fetal brain tissue in vitro, as neurons in the developing brain are exposed to relatively high concentrations of proteins only when they have cell surface membrane contact with CSF. 6. The developmental importance of high protein concentrations in CSF of the immature brain is not understood but may be involved in providing the physical force (colloid osmotic pressure) for expansion of the cerebral ventricles during brain development, as well as possibly having nutritive and specific cell development functions.
Keywords
Amino Acids/metabolism Animals Brain/cytology/*embryology/*metabolism Brain Chemistry/*physiology Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins/metabolism Electrolytes/chemistry/metabolism Glucose/metabolism Permeability Rats Sheep
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/01/2008 14:26
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:17
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