Modification of Knee Flexion Angle Has Patient-Specific Effects on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Factors During Jump Landing.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_604956998A83
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Modification of Knee Flexion Angle Has Patient-Specific Effects on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Factors During Jump Landing.
Journal
The American journal of sports medicine
Author(s)
Favre J., Clancy C., Dowling A.V., Andriacchi T.P.
ISSN
1552-3365 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0363-5465
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
44
Number
6
Pages
1540-1546
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries may be decreased through the use of intervention programs that focus on increasing the knee flexion angle during jump landing, which decreases strain on the ACL.
To investigate whether intervention training designed to change the knee flexion angle during landing causes secondary changes in other known measures associated with the risk of ACL injuries and to examine the time points when these secondary measures change.
Controlled laboratory study.
A total of 39 healthy recreational athletes performed a volleyball block jump task in an instrumented gait laboratory. The participants first completed the jumps without any modification to their normal landing technique. They were then given oral instruction to land softly and to increase their knee flexion angle during landing. Lower body kinematics and kinetics were measured before and after the modification using an optoelectronic motion capture system.
The knee flexion angle after the modification significantly increased from 11.2° to 15.2° at initial contact and from 67.8° to 100.7° at maximum flexion, and the time between initial contact and maximum flexion increased from 177.4 to 399.4 milliseconds. The flexion modification produced a substantial reduction in vertical ground-reaction force (243.1 to 187.8 %BW) with a concomitant reduction in the maximum flexion moment. Interestingly, the flexion modification only affected the abduction angle and abduction moment for the group of participants that landed in an initial adducted position before the modification and had no significant effect on the group that landed in an abducted position.
Increasing the knee flexion angle during jump landing may be an effective intervention to improve knee biomechanical risk factors associated with an ACL injury. However, the fact that the flexion modification only influenced critical risk factors (the abduction angle and abduction moment) in participants who initially landed in an adducted position suggests that the selection of interventions to prevent ACL injuries should account for patient-specific characteristics.
The study helps elucidate how increasing the knee flexion angle affects lower body biomechanics and provided evidence for the need to introduce patient-specific strategies for preventing ACL injuries.

Keywords
Adult, Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries/epidemiology, Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries/etiology, Athletic Injuries/epidemiology, Athletic Injuries/etiology, Biomechanical Phenomena, Female, Humans, Incidence, Kinetics, Knee Joint/physiology, Male, Range of Motion, Articular, Risk Factors, Volleyball/injuries, Young Adult, ACL, biomechanics, injury prevention, knee, motion analysis, volleyball
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
22/11/2017 18:11
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:17
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