Adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to constant sub-inhibitory concentrations of quaternary ammonium compounds

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_60271FEFACB7
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to constant sub-inhibitory concentrations of quaternary ammonium compounds
Journal
Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology
Author(s)
Voumard Margaux, Venturelli Leonardo, Borgatta Myriam, Croxatto Antony, Kasas Sandor, Dietler Giovanni, Breider Florian, von Gunten Urs
ISSN
2053-1400
2053-1419
ISSN-L
2053-1400
Publication state
Published
Issued date
04/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
6
Number
4
Pages
1139-1152
Language
english
Abstract
Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are widely used in consumer products for disinfection purposes. QACs are frequently detected in aquatic systems at sub-inhibitory concentrations and were found to affect the development of antimicrobial resistance if bacteria are exposed to increasing concentrations. However, the effect of a constant sub-inhibitory concentration on the development of bacterial resistance is unknown. A constant exposure to 88% of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) led to an increase of the MIC of P. aeruginosa. It increased from 80 mg l(-1) to 150 mg l(-1) after 10 cycles of exposure and remained stable after removal of BAC. When exposed to cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTMA), P. aeruginosa's MIC increased from 110 mg l(-1) to 160 mg l(-1) after 10 cycles of exposure and decreased to 120 mg l(-1) after removal of CTMA. Additionally, cross-resistance between the QACs was observed. When exposed to BAC, the MIC for CTMA increased from 110 mg l(-1) to 200 mg l(-1), and when exposed to CTMA, the MIC for BAC increased from 80 mg l(-1) to 160 mg l(-1). In contrast, the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics was not significantly affected by exposure to QACs. Finally, analyses of the membranes' nanomechanical properties of P. aeruginosa with atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed increases in cell roughness, adhesion and stiffness after treatment with CTMA. Since sub-inhibitory concentrations of QACs can be detected in (technical) aquatic systems including sediments, this may lead to a dissemination of bacteria with higher QAC resistance in the environment
Keywords
Environmental Engineering, Water Science and Technology
Web of science
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation / CRSII5_173863
Swiss National Science Foundation / 200021-144321
Swiss National Science Foundation / 407240_167137
Gebert Rüf Stiftung (Basel)
Create date
30/04/2020 13:35
Last modification date
21/01/2021 7:09
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