Alcohol control policies and socioeconomic inequalities in hazardous alcohol consumption: a 22-year cross-sectional study in a Swiss urban population.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_6018DA580A6D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Alcohol control policies and socioeconomic inequalities in hazardous alcohol consumption: a 22-year cross-sectional study in a Swiss urban population.
Journal
BMJ open
Author(s)
Sandoval J.L., Leão T., Theler J.M., Favrod-Coune T., Broers B., Gaspoz J.M., Marques-Vidal P., Guessous I.
ISSN
2044-6055 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2044-6055
Publication state
Published
Issued date
24/05/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Number
5
Pages
e028971
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Harmful use of alcohol represents a large socioeconomic and disease burden and displays a socioeconomic status (SES) gradient. Several alcohol control laws were devised and implemented, but their equity impact remains undetermined.We ascertained if an SES gradient in hazardous alcohol consumption exists in Geneva (Switzerland) and assessed the equity impact of the alcohol control laws implemented during the last two decades.
Repeated cross-sectional survey study.
We used data from non-abstinent participants, aged 35-74 years, from the population-based cross-sectional Bus Santé study (n=16 725), between 1993 and 2014.
SES indicators included educational attainment (primary, secondary and tertiary) and occupational level (high, medium and low). We defined four survey periods according to the implemented alcohol control laws and hazardous alcohol consumption (outcome variable) as >30 g/day for men and >20 g/day for women.The Slope Index of Inequality (SII) and Relative Index of Inequality (RII) were used to quantify absolute and relative inequalities, respectively, and were compared between legislative periods.
Lower educated men had a higher frequency of hazardous alcohol consumption (RII=1.87 (1.57; 2.22) and SII=0.14 (0.11; 0.17)). Lower educated women had less hazardous consumption ((RII=0.76 (0.60; 0.97)and SII=-0.04 (-0.07;-0.01]). Over time, hazardous alcohol consumption decreased, except in lower educated men.Education-related inequalities were observed in men in all legislative periods and did not vary between them. Similar results were observed using the occupational level as SES indicator. In women, significant inverse SES gradients were observed using educational attainment but not for occupational level.
Population-wide alcohol control laws did not have a positive equity impact on hazardous alcohol consumption. Targeted interventions to disadvantaged groups may be needed to address the hazardous alcohol consumption inequality gap.
Keywords
Adult, Aged, Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology, Alcohol Drinking/legislation & jurisprudence, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Health Policy, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Social Class, Socioeconomic Factors, Switzerland/epidemiology, Urban Population/statistics & numerical data, alcohol control laws, education, hazardous alcohol consumption, inequality, occupation, socioeconomic factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
14/06/2019 17:36
Last modification date
20/06/2020 6:18
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